Inclusion means everyone is in, and the company needs to engage majority people. Allies from normative cultures* are crucial to the sustainable success of women and men of color, white women, and others disadvantaged by differing from the norm.

How It Works

Listening Groups separately gather 12-15 leaders from normative cultures* and (if this option is chosen) leaders from disadvantaged cultures. They talk about things they’ve never discussed before, in a safe environment with people who are like them.

 

90 Minute Sessions

12-15 Leaders discuss their challenges and successes with inclusive leadership, in a safe environment with others who are like them

Produces themes and survey data that bring to the fore voices that the organization has never heard

 

Participants discuss their issues and successes with inclusive leadership, and how to do the practical work of being an ally or collaborating with allies. This assessment process is carefully designed and facilitated, and produces themes and survey data that explore feedback and concerns not previously identified.

*Normative Culture Defined

A normative culture is a group whose ideas and values define the 'norm' to which people outside the culture are expected to accommodate in order to find better opportunities. Normativity organizes and maintains often unspoken standards of correctness for all, and enforces expectations of conformity from those who clearly differ from the norm. A normative culture does not have to be a numerical majority. Normativity tends to define ‘the way we do things around here’.

People who are members of normative cultures often assume that they are 'normal', and that ‘Others’ should fit in.

For example, companies often have expectations for professional appearance, and employees who do not follow the guidelines are encouraged to do so, or sanctioned if they do comply. It’s about ‘fitting in’ to the norm.

Leading inclusively requires that we understand how we are individually shaped by being inside and/or outside cultural norms. And, as we lead, we learn to take into account how our colleagues experience normativity as well.

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Listening Groups

Listening Groups with Men…so that the voices of male leaders are heard, activating and fueling their commitment to lead more inclusively.

Listening Groups with Men & Women…so that the company hears from male and female leaders separately, followed by a mutual exploration of common views and problems to solve, to build relationships of trust and methods for accountability.

Multiracial Listening Groups…so that, in separate sessions, people from each racial group and their allies identify what’s working well and what needs fixing, followed by a mutual exploration of common views and problems to solve, to build relationships of trust and methods for accountability.